Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos: What people who are right a lot do differently

Source: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos: What people who are right a lot do differently
Source: 15 Common Cognitive Distortions: https://psychcentral.com/lib/15-common-cognitive-distortions/

People who are right a lot change their minds! They aren’t rigid thinkers who get stuck in the details that only support their opinion. They don’t feel a deep need to be right and argue for a position just because they came up with the idea. They can be flexible in their thinking and adjust their thinking and behaviors when they encounter new information or perspectives.

The need to always be right is also a cognitive distortion that can hamper our ability to be effective decision-makers and leaders in our diverse communities. The need to always be right, may also cause stress in relationships too when we favor our own feelings at the expense of reality–reality, perhaps offered in the form of an alternate perspective from a friend, co-worker, or family member.

At the end of the day, we need to understand that we don’t know it all, we need to consider the experiences of people not like us, and practice being flexible thinkers, because ultimately these traits only benefit us and our communities.

If You Can Do This Many Pushups, You’ll Probably Live Longer

Source: If You Can Do This Many Pushups, You’ll Probably Live Longer

Imagine being part of a group that had a 96% less chance of getting heart conditions! I’d jump at that! Although being able to perform a bunch of push ups doesn’t guarantee that you’ll avoid heart conditions, it seems likely to decrease the odds. So, get out there and do some pushups, eat healthy foods, and take care of your mental health. After all, exercise has long been associated with improved mood and overall psychological well-being. If you can avoid heart problems, why not add this exercise to your routine?

How successful people handle stress – Yahoo Finance

Source: How successful people handle stress – Yahoo Finance.

Travis Bradberry writes a good article about Yale study findings about the positive and negative effects of stress on the body and brain. Limited stress “entices” the brain to create new cells related to memory; however, prolonged stress has many negative health effects, including reduced gray matter in the brain that we use for self-control. Successful people develop skills to manage their stress levels so that they solve problems by remaining calm under pressure.