Suicide doesn’t set you free (Opinion) – CNN.com

Suicide doesn’t set you free (Opinion) – CNN.com.

Robin Williams’s death hit me hard. I remember watching Mrs. DoubtFire at my dad’s house during a very difficult time in my life–during my parents’ divorce. I laughed hard and felt deep sadness during the movie. I also remember watching Aladdin and Robin Williams as Genie’s voice. Robin Williams was one of my all-time favorite comedians and I’ll miss him.

I thought this article was a great reminder that those who are experiencing great pain in their lives and wanting to escape the pain through suicide are loved. Life is precious and suicide should not be talked about as an option–especially in the media. Those who are at risk for suicide must know that they are loved, cared for, and that help is available. Furthermore, mental health issues and solutions should not be stigmatized. Help is available for those who are in great pain and considering suicide. Rest in Peace Robin Williams.

Bipolar disorder and the creative mind Opinion – CNN.com

Source: Bipolar disorder and the creative mind Opinion – CNN.com.

This is a really interesting article on creative people who also suffer from bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder seems to appear more often alongside highly creative people. This doesn’t mean that if you’re creative, you have bipolar disorder, but among creative people, the disorder appears more often than in non-creative populations.

The Secret of Effective Motivation – NYTimes.com

The Secret of Effective Motivation – NYTimes.com.

This is a very interesting look at two different ways of categorizing motivation: internal and instrumental motivation and their relation to a person’s success or failure later on. The first (internal motivation) is a motivation that is closely related to the activity that the motivation produces. For example, I want to go to graduate school to learn so I can be a better therapist. I’m likely to learn in graduate school, pass the licensing exam, and go into private practice. That’s a likely successful outcome. The second kind of motivation (instrumental motivation) seems to be a motivation that is much farther removed from the actual activity.

What Suffering Does – NYTimes.com

What Suffering Does – NYTimes.com.

I really like David Brooks. In this article, he simultaneously recognizes that suffering–although terrible–can turn out for good. It can mold and shape us into something else, perhaps something better. It can direct our lives toward something greater. I believe suffering can be dangerous and detrimental; but I also believe how I choose to respond to suffering often determines whether or not I become better. I don’t believe suffering always turns out for the worse. Suffering can actually turn out to be beneficial to us and others. It can be hopeful.